Tuesday, 26 January 2016

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers. 10 is just a suggestion to aim for if you can hit it -- do a list of 3 or 5 or 20 on your list. Your post, your choice!

Today's Topic: Freebie Week! Pick a topic near and dear to your heart! Something you wished was on our official list!

Today I've decided to write about my Top Ten Fictional Bookworms :)


1. Hermione Granger from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series
Hermione's probably the ultimate bookworm. She's a truly fantastic character (bright, inquisitive, determined, compassionate, etc) and her love of books certainly came in handy throughout the series! All of the knowledge that she gained from her intense reading got herself, Harry and Ron out of many perilous adventures. Her love of reading not only empowered her, it saved the world! 

2. Catherine Morland and Henry Tilney from Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey
Although there's that part in Pride and Prejudice where Miss Bingley accuses Elizabeth Bennet of having no pleasure in anything but reading, it seems to me that it's really Catherine Morland who's the big bookworm out of the Austen heroines. She stays up late into the night to read novels - what bookworm hasn't done that?! - and I think it's beyond adorable that she and Henry Tilney bonded over their mutual love of reading :) I also included Henry in this list because even though I'm extremely fond of Catherine he's my favourite Austen character :)

3. Jo March from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women
Jo March adored books, wrote stories of her own, and would then act them out with her best friend Laurie and her sisters. I related to her so much when I was growing up and this pretty awesome quote is about her :)

4.  Matilda Wormwood from Roald Dahl's Matilda
A heroine from another childhood favourite! To be honest my love of the story has more to do with the Danny DeVito film (it's been about 20 years since I last read the Roald Dahl novel!) but I could definitely relate to Matilda's love of books and I've always cherished the memory of reading it.

5. Beauty from Robin McKinley's Beauty
I was sorely tempted to include Belle from Disney's Beauty and the Beast in this list because she's always been my favourite Disney heroine and she would have probably been the very first fictional bookworm that I ever encountered. However since she isn't a book character I've gone for the Beauty of the Robin McKinley novel instead. Beauty loves books just as much as Belle and I seriously covet her library. You think the library in the Disney film is amazing? It is nothing, nothing compared to the library in this book!

6. Howl Pendragon from Diana Wynne Jones' Howl's Moving Castle
Howl's Moving Castle is a wonderful book and I really need to finish my review of it! Anyway Howl's hilarious and even though it's never explicitly mentioned that he's a huge bookworm there are some very strong hints that he grew up in a book-loving family. He quotes from Hamlet and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, his chosen surname comes from Arthurian mythology, and his sister's house is even called Rivendell!

7. Faramir from J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
Faramir's one of my absolute favourite characters from the LOTR and even though it's never explicitly mentioned that he's a big bookworm either it's heavily implied. We're told that he's "gentle in bearing and a lover of lore and music" and also that he was "the wizard's pupil". He probably spent hours and hours learning all about the lore and history of Gondor and Númenor and he seems like a Hamlet or a Rhaegar Targaryen figure - a bookish intellectual type forced into becoming a man of action.

8. Hamlet from William Shakespeare's Hamlet
Hamlet's an obviously well-read, cultured intellectual. We know he loves plays and academia, he writes poetry, and we see him reading on-stage at one point. I love Hamlet's character because his depression and grief in this play is so raw and affecting but also because he's so witty and sarcastic. I love how he can insult people without them even realising it! :D

9. Kvothe from Patrick Rothfuss' The Kingkiller Chronicle
Kvothe's really more of a music nerd and a theatre buff than a bookworm but he's an awesome character, he loves words, and is filled with awe and wonder when he eventually manages to get into the University's archives.

10. Thursday Next from Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair
Thursday comes from an alternate universe in which everyone is obsessed with literature (a book lover's paradise!) She's also a badass, funny and resourceful female war veteran and literary detective who specialises in 19th century literature. She even gets to travel into her favourite book (Jane Eyre) and make her OTP get together and what bookworm hasn't dreamed of doing that?!

Who are your favourite fictional bookworms?  

Wednesday, 20 January 2016

'Anne of Green Gables' by L.M. Montgomery (1908)

Synopsis: Anne of Green Gables is the first in a children's book series. Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert are unmarried, middle-aged siblings who live on a farm called Green Gables near the small town of Avonlea on Prince Edward Island, Canada. As the pair of them are both getting on in years they decide to adopt a young boy who'll be able to help them out on the farm. However, when Matthew goes to pick the child up at the local train station he's shocked to discover that the orphanage has made a mistake and hasn't sent the promised boy at all. Instead they've sent an exuberant 11 year old girl called Anne Shirley. Matthew is won over by the child almost immediately and not knowing what else to do takes Anne back to the farm. After some debating with an initially reluctant Marilla, who is much stricter and more practical than Matthew, they eventually decide to let Anne stay with them. The book then chronicles Anne's life over the next five years. During this time she becomes best friends with her neighbour Diana Barry, develops a rivalry with a class-mate called Gilbert Blythe after he teases her about her red hair, and gets herself into many escapades and amusing situations.


Anne of Green Gables is one of those children's classics that I never actually got to read as a child but now that I've finally got round to reading the book I can completely understand why so many readers cherish it. Although there isn't really much of a plot to Green Gables (since it's mostly concerned with Anne's day-to-day life at the farm) it's just such a sweet book. L.M. Montgomery's descriptive nature passages in it are utterly beautiful and the character of Anne Shirley is a lovely and engaging heroine. I've happened to come across a few reviews of this book from readers who said that they found Anne's talkativeness and tendency to vocalise every single thought in her head extremely annoying - which I admit I can understand to a certain extent because I often find very talkative people extremely annoying myself (both in fiction and in real life) - but for me the things that Anne came out with in this book were so charming and amusingly melodramatic that her verbosity actually became a very endearing character trait. I also loved Anne's deep appreciation of nature, her huge imagination (e.g. she renames all of the local landmarks with things like "The Haunted Wood" and "Lake of Shining Waters"), and her absolute insistence on her name being spelt with an "e" because it looks so much more distinguished. As a "Hannah" who wants to scream when my name gets misspelt as "Hanna" or "Hana" I could relate! :D

That's pretty much all that I have to say about Anne of Green Gables really because as much as I enjoyed this book I have to admit that I didn't love it nearly as much as the only other L.M. Montgomery novel I've read which is The Blue Castle. Anne of Green Gables is cute and charming and lovely but I just didn't find it as riveting and emotionally engaging as that book. The Blue Castle is an adult's novel and its intense romance and more mature themes were obviously better suited for where I'm at in my life. I'm really glad that I finally got to read Anne of Green Gables though because I definitely liked it and it's cemented L.M. Montgomery as being one of my favourite writers. I look forward to reading the sequels and eventually watching the Megan Follows films :)

Rating: 4/5

Tuesday, 19 January 2016

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers. 10 is just a suggestion to aim for if you can hit it -- do a list of 3 or 5 or 20 on your list. Your post, your choice!

Today's Topic: Ten Books on my Winter TBR List
 

I'm doing a slight variation on the TTT topic of the day ("Ten Books I've Recently Added to My TBR list") because I don't have a physical TBR list as such (it's entirely in my head) and I usually can't remember exactly when and where I first heard about a book. So instead here are all of the books that I'm hopefully going to read and review in the next few months :)

1. The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham. I found out about this book just over a year ago and added it to my Classics Club list. This one's got an interesting setting (1920s' China) and is supposed to be very romantic and tragic and beautiful. I've been told that it will give me all the feels!

2. Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson. This is the first in a high-fantasy series. I found out about it after seeing quite a lot of Kingkiller Chronicle fans recommending it. The book's been described as an Italian Job/Ocean's Eleven-ish heist story only set in a Middle Earth-esque world in which Sauron actually won the War of the Ring. How awesome does that sound?! Come to think of it, the premise actually sounds very similar to Star Wars: Rogue One. Now I know why I'm so excited about that film! :D

3. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon. I've been wanting to read this book for years but have just never got round to it. This book won the Pulitzer Prize and it sounds truly fascinating. It's about these two Jewish cousins living in 1940s' Brooklyn who decide to produce a comic book series based on one of the cousin's experiences in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia. Apparently this book gives a wonderful insight into American culture and the rise of the superhero genre and I'm sure it will get me in the mood for my trip to New York later this year :) Another reason for my wanting to read this book? Benedict Cumberbatch is a huge fan and has said several times that he'd jump at the chance to star in an adaptation of it.

4. Anne of Avonlea and Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery. My regular readers will probably already know that I've set myself the challenge of reading all of the Anne of Green Gables books this year. I'm currently reading the first book (review forthcoming) and I'm hoping to read the next two books in the series by the end of the season.

5. The Glimpses of the Moon by Edith Wharton. Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence and Summer were two of my favourite books from last year and the next book of hers that I want to read is this one. It's supposed to be the most light-hearted and optimistic of her works so I'm very curious about it.

6. Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L. Sayers. After finally reading all of the canonical Sherlock Holmes stories I've decided to make the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries my next detective series project and Clouds of Witness is the second book in that series.

7. False Colours by Georgette Heyer. Ever since reading Heyer's Cotillion back in 2013 I've never been able to go more than a few months without feeling the urge to read one of her historical romances. They're a lot of fun and have really helped me deal with my "Jane Austen only wrote six novels and although I can always re-read them and watch the adaptations that still doesn't change the fact that I'll never experience the delight of reading a new Jane Austen novel for the first time" pain.

8. Four Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Romanov Grand Duchesses by Helen Rappaport. A historical biography about the Romanov sisters. I've been trying to incorporate more non-fiction into my reading and this biography is supposed to be extremely good.

9. American Gods by Neil Gaiman (re-read). American Gods was my first Neil Gaiman novel and I didn't actually like it very much even though a lot of people out there consider it to be his best work. I didn't hate the book. I was just kind of ambivalent to it because none of the characters left much of an impression on me and I found the story in general downright... weird :S I'm curious as to whether I'd appreciate this book more on a second read though because in those years since I last read it I've found other Gaiman novels that I've really loved. And I feel I ought to read it before Bryan Fuller's TV adaptation comes out next year.

10. S by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst. After seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which J.J. Abrams did such an incredible job on (it's a month later and I still can't stop thinking about the film!), I now want to read his book S. It's been described as an interactive, metafictional mystery novel (intriguing!) and I've read rave reviews for it. The prose in the book was written by a novelist called Doug Dorst but it was Abrams who came up with the actual story.

And now you know what book reviews to expect from me in the next few months! Has anyone read any of these? Do you want to read any of them?

Friday, 15 January 2016

'Mistborn: The Final Empire' by Brandon Sanderson (2006)

Synopsis: Mistborn: The Final Empire is the first novel in the high-fantasy series The Mistborn and is set in a medieval-esque dystopian world called Scadriel - a place where there are rainfalls of ash, where all plants are brown, where mysterious mists come out at night, and where certain individuals can gain magical powers by ingesting certain types of metal. These individuals are called the "Mistings" or the "Mistborn". 1000 years before the start of the novel it was prophesied that a "Hero of Ages" would become an immortal and save the world from a terrifying force called the Deepness. However, although the Deepness was repelled, the Hero then took on the title of "Lord Ruler", established an empire, and became an evil despotic tyrant. Under his rule the empire is divided into two social classes: the nobility (the descendants of those who helped him achieve power) and the brutally oppressed peasantry called the Skaa. 3 years before the start of the novel, a half-Skaa thief called Kelsier was imprisoned in the hellish Pits of Hathsin (the equivalent of a modern-day concentration camp). It was there that Kelsier discovered that he was a mistborn. Using his powers to escape, Kelsier has now returned to Luthadel, the capital city of the empire, to recruit the elite of the criminal underworld for an elaborate heist. His aim: to overthrow the Empire by stealing its treasury and collapsing its economy. When Kelsier then discovers a 16 year old female street urchin called Vin, and discovers that she is also a mistborn, he decides to make her his protégé by training her to use her powers and by recruiting her into his criminal gang. He also gets Vin to spy on the nobility by attending opulent balls in Luthadel where she poses as a noblewoman. It's during these balls that Vin meets an eccentric, bookish and idealistic nobleman called Elend Venture who is the heir to the most powerful noble house in Luthadel. But although Vin suspects that Elend has Skaa sympathies and is beginning to fall in love with him she's still by no means certain that she can trust him, and Kelsier is having difficulties of his own as he attempts to lead the revolution against the Lord Ruler.


I'd been longing to read this book for a while! There were a few different reasons why...
  1. I first found out about it last year after seeing quite a lot of Kingkiller Chronicle fans recommending it (and also Patrick Rothfuss who is the author of those books!) and, since I loved that series, I naturally figured that I'd probably enjoy the Mistborn series as well. 
  2. The heist element of the story was extremely intriguing to me.
  3. After looking into the series some more I also found out that the technology and world of the series significantly changes over time which isn't something that I've ever encountered in a fantasy series before! For instance: whilst the first three books in the Mistborn series are set in a medieval-esque world, the other books in the series take place several hundreds of years later with the world of Scadriel having shifted into more of a Victorian-esque environment. Brandon Sanderson eventually plans to have the final books in the series take place in a futuristic sci-fi setting!
In the end this book definitely lived up to my high expectations and it was a hugely entertaining read! :) It's an epic fantasy novel that's full of action, adventure, suspense and political intrigue and, although it's rather dark and violent at times, it still has plenty of humour and heart. Sanderson's prose lacks the elegance and beautiful lyricism of Patrick Rothfuss's in The Kingkiller Chronicle but the book is still very solidly written and touches on some deep themes like that of faith, courage, hope and identity. The book is rather long but is still very tightly plotted and paced overall and its magic system manages to be hugely creative, imaginative and intricate without ever becoming too convoluted - and leads to some excellent action scenes that would be thrilling to watch in a screen adaptation! The worldbuilding in this book is also impressive. Even though we don't actually get to "see" very much of its world beyond the capital city of Luthadel and its surrounding countryside I still felt that I got a good feel for its politics, society and landscape. The misty nights and ash-stained buildings in particular gave a lot of atmosphere to the book - and another thing that enhanced the book's atmosphere was that each chapter began with a brief extract from the diary of the Hero of Ages. It was a terrific touch that added quite a bit to the novel.

The two main characters in this book, Vin and Kelsier, are extremely well-developed as well. As a lonely street urchin who has been abused for most of her life, Vin lacks confidence in herself and is extremely paranoid and suspicious of Kelsier and his crew at the beginning. But as the novel progresses she slowly begins to trust the crew and to open up to them - and the more her powers develop the more her self-confidence grows. Vin's character development in this book is excellent and is lovely to read. In contrast, her mentor Kelsier is far more optimistic and cheerful than she is (or at least he is on the surface) and isn't at all the typical kind of mentor figure that you usually find in fantasy stories. He's a sly, witty, impulsive hothead! Kelsier's character development is more subtly done than Vin's but is still apparent as he comes to terms with his time in the Pits and the death of his wife and he is eventually able to overcome his innate prejudice towards the nobility. When it comes to the secondary characters in this book I was especially fond of Breeze, Ham, Sazed and Elend in particular. I loved Breeze's wit, Ham's fondness for philosophical discussions, Sazed's air of quiet badassery, and Elend's love of books and his romance with Vin. Elend's first scene with Vin was quite possibly my favourite scene in the entire book by the way: it's so funny and adorable that it's almost like something out of a good romantic comedy!

My only issues with this book are very minor. One of the things that I initially wasn't so keen on in this book was that the dialogue features modern-day American slang in places which I found very odd given the medieval-esque setting of the book. That took a bit of getting used to. I found the book a little bit slow near the start as well although the pacing soon picked up. Overall though this book is definitely one of the most impressive fantasy novels that I've read in recent years and I really hope that the sequels can live up to its quality. It certainly wouldn't be the first time that I've flipped out over a book only to end up being horribly disappointed in its sequels so... *fingers crossed*

Rating: 5/5

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers. 10 is just a suggestion to aim for if you can hit it -- do a list of 3 or 5 or 20 on your list. Your post, your choice!

Today's Topic: Top ten resolutions I have for 2016 (can be bookish, personal resolutions, "I resolve to finally read these 10 books, series I resolve to finish in 2016, etc).

I'm not usually one for making new year's resolutions but I've made quite a few for 2016 and they're mostly bookish. Here they are!

1. To read 50 books. In 2014 I read 52 books and in 2015 I read 54 so if I don't manage to read at least 50 this year I'll be disappointed with myself. I know that there's nothing wrong with reading less than 50 and that reading isn't a competition but I just like to have to something to aim for.

2. To finally read and finish L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables series. I never actually got to read these books as a child. I don't really know why. I think it might just be down to me never coming across them... Anyway I've been hearing so much about the Anne books ever since I started book blogging that I'm finally going to read them all this year. I'll be starting the first book as soon as I finish the book I'm currently on. If I like the series (which I'm expecting to since I really loved Montgomery's adult novel The Blue Castle) I'll also check out the Megan Follows films and the Green Gables Fables webseries.


Found on Bookriot

3. To come up with a new feature for the blog. I'm not sure what that will be just yet but I've got some ideas in mind...

4. To have read at least 20 of the books on my Classics Club list. Tomorrow it will be exactly one year since I started the challenge and in that one year I've only managed to read seven of the books on my list. I want to start making much better progress than this. I really don't want to get to my fourth year with most of the books still left unread!

5. To re-read the following books:
  • The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  • The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
  • Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
  • David Copperfield and A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  • American Gods by Neil Gaiman

6. To sort out my bookshelves. *groans* I keep putting this off but my book shelves badly need a sort-out. I'm going to have to give away books that I didn't like and books that I'm probably not going to re-read again and even then I think I might have to start double-stacking my shelves.

7. To comment more on other blogs and to reply to comments faster. I love to receive comments  on this blog and yet I'm terrible for not leaving comments on other blogs! *blushes* What tends to happen is that I'll click on someone's post, reply to it (erm, in my head) and then not leave an actual comment. I must work on that! And I also want to reply to all of the comments that I receive on this blog within no more than a week after the comments have been left (does that even make sense, lol?)

8. To make more of an effort in reading poetry, plays and non-fiction instead of just reading novels all the time. This was a reading aim that I had for last year and I failed miserably at it. But this year I'm hoping to read Vera Brittain's Testament of Youth, Helen Rappport's Four Sisters (a Romanov biography), Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Oscar Wilde's plays, and the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe.

9. To brush up on my Shakespeare by watching a lot of adaptations and filmed stage productions :)

10. To participate in a sci-fi month blog event in November. One of my blogger friends (Lianne over at Eclectic Tales) has been doing this challenge for the past couple of years and I want to give it a go myself this year. "Sci-Fi Month" is a blog event held by Rinn over at Rinn Reads and Lisa at Over the Effing Rainbow. So for the whole of November I'm going to be reading and reviewing sci-fi books. I don't know what those books will be just yet but I'm thinking of reading and reviewing at least one book from my favourite sci-fi subgenres: so they'd be one space opera book, one time travel book, and one dystopia.

What are your resolutions? :)

Friday, 1 January 2016

Bookish and Not So Bookish Thoughts

Bookish and Not-So-Bookish Thoughts is a weekly blogging event hosted by Bookishly Boisterous. It allows book bloggers (and non-book bloggers) to write about pretty much anything, bookish or otherwise (i.e. share exciting plans for the weekend, rants on things they've encountered during the week, etc)



1. Happy new year everyone! I'm riding high on a wave of optimism and positivity right now and I almost feel like I could do anything! I hope all of my readers feel the same and if not I pray that you soon will be :)

2. It's been about four months since my last Bookish and Not So Bookish post (I didn't mean to leave it that long!) and I honestly can't recall doing anything particularly interesting during those first three months. My December was fantastic though! I got to see a musical for the first time in over a year when the UK tour of Guys and Dolls came to my hometown. Having now seen that show I don't think I'd call it one of my absolute favourite musicals but I still had a really good time. I also saw my first ever ballet in December when I got to see The Nutcracker and that was an amazing experience. The Tchaikovsky score is wonderful, the dancing was mesmerising, and the production had some of the best sets that I've ever seen! But as amazing as that was the highlight of my December was undoubtedly....

3. THE FORCE AWAKENS! Oh Star Wars, how I love you... I had ridiculously high expectations about this film and yet it still managed to deliver. I won't give out any spoilers but J.J. Abrams completely nailed the tone and the gritty, earthy aesthetic of the original Star Wars trilogy (so much so that I can't help but wish he was directing Episode VIII) and the film was so funny and emotional and suspenseful! John Williams' music for it was as epic as ever. Rey, Finn, Poe, Kylo Ren and even BB-8 are all wonderfully engaging and interesting characters. The entire cast gave brilliant performances in it although Daisy Ridley and Adam Driver were the stand-outs for me. I'm in love with TFA basically! My favourite Star Wars film is still The Empire Strikes Back but I love The Force Awakens just as much as the other two films in the original trilogy (in case you're wondering I refuse to consider the prequels as canon). I've seen TFA twice now, I've pre-ordered the DVD, I'm reading the novelisation of it at the moment (which I wouldn't much recommend to be honest, it's quite awkwardly-written and is nowhere near as fun as the film), and I can't wait for Rogue One and the other main saga films! I'll stop gushing about it now but TFA was my favourite film of the year. The other films I saw at the cinema and loved this year (in no particular order apart from the first one) were... Brooklyn, Cinderella, The Theory of Everything and Into the Woods. And yes, I have noticed that Domhnall Gleeson was in my two favourite films of the year :)

4. I have a major holiday announcement to make in this post as well... I'M GOING TO NEW YORK! It will be my first time in the city and my first ever visit to the United States! I'm going with my mother in mid-November and we'll be there for 4.5 days. We're planning on seeing and doing all of the major tourist stuff in Manhattan while we're there (the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, etc) and we'll be seeing something on Broadway although I don't know what that will be at this stage. I'd also like for us to spend a day in Brooklyn and to go to the Strand Bookstore while we're there. To be honest it hasn't fully sunk in yet that I'm going but I know I'll be very excited about my trip once it does!


5. And now I'll let you know about some bookish things. Well, I've finally gotten around to Tolstoy's War and Peace and I'm about 200 pages into it. I'm still going to be reading some other books on the side though. That isn't something that I usually like doing (I much prefer to only focus on one book at a time) but I think it's going to take me quite a while to finish the book and I don't want to go too long without posting any book reviews.

 6. Are there any fans of Diana Wynne Jones' Howl's Moving Castle reading this? I re-read that book a while ago (and finally got round to reading its sequels) and I love it! I'm hoping to finally put up my review of it sometime next week. Anyway, I love this fake fan-made live-action trailer of HMC so much that I thought I'd share it. As fond as I am of the Studio Ghibli film I'd be thrilled to see a new live-action adaptation of the book some day that was more faithful to its story.


7. My birthday will be coming up soon and I imagine I'll do what I usually do on my birthday which is to have dinner out with the family. I'd like to do some shopping on the day though and I'm quite tempted to buy the complete boxset of Avatar: The Last Airbender as a present for myself. I've been hearing a lot about that show recently and it sounds like something I would really love.

8. If you scroll up to the top of the home page you'll see that I've created a Features page that has links to my Classics Club list and all of my Top Ten Tuesday and Bookish and Not So Bookish Thoughts posts. I'm just trying to make my blog a little more user-friendly :)

9. I'm also trying to work out what I want to do with my social media at the moment. I have a Pinterest account that I'm very happy with (I'm on that website/app all the time!) but I'm toying with the idea of getting a Twitter account now as well. I did used to have a Twitter account but that was many years ago and I eventually de-activated it because I didn't have any other friends using that site at the time. But now I do know other people who use it so I'm thinking of starting a new account up again.

10. And just one more thing before I go, later on tonight I'm going to watch Sherlock's The Abominable Bride with a nice glass of wine :) Yay!

Bookish and Not So Bookish Thoughts (Archive Post)

(c) Found on Tumblr

Bookish and Not-So-Bookish Thoughts is a weekly blogging event hosted by Bookishly Boisterous. It allows book bloggers (and non-book bloggers) to write about pretty much anything, bookish or otherwise (i.e. share exciting plans for the weekend, rants on things they've encountered during the week, etc)

April 2017


December 2016


August 2016


June 2016


May 2016


March 2016


January 2016

Top Ten Tuesday (Archive Post)


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers. 10 is just a suggestion to aim for if you can hit it -- do a list of 3 or 5 or 20 on your list. Your post, your choice!

Top Ten Summer Beach Reads

Top Ten Favourite Covers of Books I've Read

Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly NOT Want to Read a Book

Top Ten Opening Sentences

Top Ten Books I Loved Less/More Than I Thought I Would

Top Ten Books of 2016

Top Ten Sci-Fi Books I Want to Read

Top Ten Characters I'd Like To Check In With

Top Ten Books You Could Read in a Day

Ten Three Books I Feel Differently About After Time Has Passed

Top Ten Bookworm Delights

Top Ten Books Every Jane Austen Fan Should Read

Top Ten Most Recent 5 Star Reads

Top Ten Eight Books on My Spring TBR List

Top Ten Literary Themed Songs

Top Ten Fictional Bookworms

Top Ten Books on My Winter TBR List

Top Ten Resolutions I Have for 2016

Top Ten Books I Read in 2015

Top Ten Books I Wouldn't Mind Santa Leaving Under My Tree This Year

Top Ten Quotes from Books I Read in the Past Year or So